All Phases class is for experienced students who are working on new or ongoing projects classified at phase levels I-XX. The student’s embroidering skills are developed through formal instruction in new techniques as new phase pieces are begun. In addition, students are given guidance and support as they continue with ongoing phase work.

Four Seasons – Simplified Design
L6″ x W10″
Gold Nishijin 10″

The cornerstone of JEC’s class curriculum, there are a total of 36 All Phases class days per annum. Divided into two-or four-day sessions, tuition is $40.00 daily. Students close to Atlanta may wish to take advantage of a once-a-year tuition fee of $550.00 which allows students to attend as many class days as they like with no further tuition payments for one year.

Class Application Forms for All Phases Students


Apply Online

online formJEC Class Application Form for All Phases Student


E-MAIL FRIENDLY

MS-Word02JEC Class Application Form for All Phases StudentUpdated 5/2012


PRINTOUT-FRIENDLY
(fax/regular mail)
JEC Class Application Form for All Phases StudentUpdated 5/2012

Phase Designs

The Phase designs are JEC's curriculum. The stitcher gains skills and the Japanese sense for embroidery by working through each Phase. (Phase 10 represents the stitcher's "graduation" to advanced stitching.)

Distilled into the most basic of the art’s techniques, this Pre-Phase New Encounter was designed to be both appealing and
less intimidating for beginners of Japanese embroidery.

Students, with the guidance of their teachers, will be able to choose motifs for the background fan while stitching the design. Completed pieces with different novel effects will be introduced later on the JEC website for new students to choose from.

Just as the two fans in the design meet, we hope this will become the stitcher’s encounter with a new lifework, new friends, and a new self.

” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_001-New-Encounter4.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Pre-Phase 1 Pre-Phase 1

In Japan it’s traditional to give a person a bouquet of flowers when he or she begins a major new venture. This bouquet is given to the new student to begin their training in Japanese Embroidery. It is a gift from the Heart of Japan.

This design is composed with primary colors, red for the dianthus, blue for the iris and yellow for the valerian. To these fundamental colors, the feminine color of purple was added along with green. Dark brown was used to add depth to the design, while white offers a sense of spaciousness. Gold provides a touch of luxury.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/105-Bouquet-from-the-Heart-of-Japan-with-color.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”> Phase I
Phase 1

The cypress fan was used by court nobles, and symbolizes elegance and opulence. Sue means “end” and hiro means “expand.” Fans open from the pivot outward; the expansion symbolizes prosperity and expansiveness, concepts that also apply to each student’s progress in Japanese embroidery. This phase 2 curriculum builds on the techniques used in phase 1. In addition, new techniques such as couching and braided cords are introduced, preparing the student for the next phase.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p203-ci14.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 2
Phase 2
Venerable Friends represents the way that we observe the knowledge and experience of our predecessors and associates through their books. Also, our favorite books, those that we read and reread, those that shape our personalities and outlook on life, come to be dear old friends.

This phase emphasizes stitching the designs on top of an embroidered foundation. This is a special set of techniques generally not found in other types of embroidery.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p305-ci8.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 3
Phase 3

Embroidery Sculpture
Phase 4
When you examine a Mobius strip, the front of the strip eventually becomes the back side of the strip, which will become the front side once again. So it is with our lives, the reverse side becomes the front side, which will become the reverse side before you know it. Moreover, when the center of the Mobius strip is cut lengthwise, it becomes a larger circle instead of separating into two pieces. It is our wish that the human bond be the same.

Here the student learns to stitch cords. The success in stitching the double central braid depends upon the student’s skill in couching a smooth and evenly spaced outline before the cord is actually stitched. Much of this skill is gained in couching the leaves in phase 4.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p504-ci8.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Message From Above
Phase 5

A beautiful lady contemplates a beautiful flower. At the same time the cherry blooms, the blossoms begin to fall. Even such a beautiful lady cannot maintain her beauty forever. While the lady contemplates the fallen cherry blossom, she must wonder, “what type of beauty is not lost, but deepens with time.”

This phase is an alternative to the Loving Couple. It is designed to practice flat and twisted silk foundations, short stitch holding, and line of staggered.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p612-ci8.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 6
Phase 6

The colorful male duck swims unconcerned while the female duck swims behind him watching for an enemy in the sky such as hawks, eagles, or kites. When a predator attacks, the showy colored male is the target. The subdued-colored female can escape into the bush, to continue to raise their young and accomplish her role.

Let’s not envy or compare ourselves with others. Outward beauty can attract evil from outside oneself as well as awaken evil within. This evil can cause us to fail to complete our life’s work.

The primary technique that is learned in this phase is short stitch holding and line of staggered diagonals.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_Phase611.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 6
Phase 6

The camellia blooms at year’s end, creating a decorative accent in an otherwise bleak season and heralding the advent of spring. The evergreen leaves survive even in severe and cold weather and allow the beautiful flowers to bloom. The flower, fruit and trunk are used for various practical purposes, such as camellia oil, lumber for high quality craft products, and charcoal for polishing lacquer. It is also known as a symbol of longevity; there is a 400-year-old camellia tree still flourishing in Kyoto.

This design incorporates the realistic techniques that are based on the long and short stitch.

Sample Produced by Advanced Student” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_phase711.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 7
Phase 7

Phase 7
Phase 7
In Japan, we have a legend about the Lion who reigns as King of all the animals. In the flower world, known for her stately splendor,the Peony reigns as Queen of the Flowers.

This phase teaches the “fuzzy effects”. The embroidery is composed of straight lines of stitching, laid along the valleys of the silk crepe fabric. The vibrant realism of the technique is created by varying the size of the thread, the method of couching, and the color of thread. We have tried to capture the dignity and grace of this majestic beauty with the sophisticated fuzzy effect techniques.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p804-ci8.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Long Spring Blossoms
Phase 8

This phase is a copy of one of the Konbuin Fukusa, a gift cover, which the fifth Shogun of the Tokugawa line, Tsunayoshi, used to wrap the gifts he presented to his wife Zuishunin, during the Edo period. The most skilled embroiders of the time were chosen to create the work. This work is known as an excellent sample of Edo embroidery because of the quality of the design, the color, the technique selection, and the stitching technique.

In Phase 9, the student is challenged to demonstrate their skill with these works, which are designated as Important Cultural Properties in Japan.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_phase_911.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 9
Phase 9

Phase 9
Phase 9
In Japanese history the Heian Period was a time symbolic of great beauty and elegance. Representative of that era is a series of poems known as the ‘Shikishi of 36 Poets’-‘shikishi’ is a beautifully decorated piece of paper specifically used when writing poems.
On the motif itself you will notice that there are five different papers. The four lower shikishi represent spring, summer, fall, and winter. The fifth (top center) represents the cosmos, or eternity.

This new phase IX piece has been designed to reinforce techniques superimposed on a weft foundation.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p920-ci9.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 9
Phase 9

Kusudama, was designed for a graduation piece which encompass all techniques. All the stitches not previously worked are included in this beautiful design of two flower balls of the type used at New Year’s for decorating a Japanese house. Contact JEC office for Phase X class registration and certification requirement.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p1001-ci15.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 10
Phase 10
After learning all forty-six techniques in ten phases, students step up to a new stage and learn “sensibility.” From phase 11 through phase 14, we are not only learning the technique itself but also the color feeling of the four seasons. Yushoku is a stylized motif typical of Japanese embroidery. It means “people with knowledge/occupation.” The pattern was only used for the nobility.

The design, color, fabric and techniques used in Phase 11 are specially selected to express the typical Japanese summer feeling. The idea is to give one an impression of coolness at the same time one feels a bit of the heat of summer. The fabric, called Ro, has a line of holes in the weft valley, to allow the breeze to pass through.

Summer is a time of vitality. The rice plant grows bigger leaves because of the intense heat and sunlight, it is similar to the younger days of human beings when they can develop their talents.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p1103-ci8.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 11
Phase 11

Delicate cherry blossoms, and the young-green bamboo, create a subtle spring- taste enhanced by the plum, camellia, and chrysanthemum flowers of early, mid and late season. The variety of plants demonstrates that spring is not just one month or one flower. In addition, the Imperial Family is called to mind by the carts in the background.

The rectangular shapes in the foreground are poem papers used for writing poetry in one’s best calligraphy. The beautiful patterns on the paper enhance the overall presentation of the poem.

Spring is the time for planting rice, putting seed in the ground and forming sprouts and roots. In the same way, childhood is the time of formation for the person. After birth we start to be interested in the world and our ideas about the world and life begin to take shape. It is a time of energy and learning.
” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p1201-ci8.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 12
Phase 13

The atmosphere of winter is elegant and gorgeous. It is a “golden age”. The colors have a hint of the fire that should be in the hearth. Yushoku winter uses patterns, which evoke the palace in ancient times. It is important to show rich, heavy stitching through superimposed layers.

One efforts should yield a good life in old age, just as the rice plant bears a rich harvest.

Some leeway is allowed for individual needs. Designs for more advanced students continue to be added each year. In addition to the phase pieces, many practice designs and a small selection of especially challenging designs are available. These may be worked as students feel that their skill is suitable for the piece. Mr. Tamura also creates special designs to meet individual needs.

” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_phase1312.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Landing Crane
Phase 13

Among design motifs such as shippo, shokko, and sayagata patterns, which are the traditional designs created by human hands, only the kikko pattern can be seen in in lotus pods, honey combs, heads of tsukushi (field horsetail), and scouring rush, in the world of nature.

This design shows important stages in a person’s life. Starting from innocent babyhood, (battledore and a shuttlecock), the time for academic discipline, (books), burning our hearts with love as fragile as the cherry blossom, (letter), and next,  marriage (shell box). You eventually strive for social success (treasures), encountering the enrichment of the life, (rice plant and a noisemaker), various events, living together until you have gray hairs, (takasago), a bloom and a bamboo rake representing lifetime spouse.

All these life events are connected by Kikko pattern. The Tie of Life.” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_phase1411.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 14
phase 14

Phase 14
Phase 14
What is a happy family? Happy does not mean that there are never have any troubles and that all family members are perfect.

Just as each member of the family has his or her own role, each crane in the design has their own color. In the left panel we find the daughter and young son. The daughter has some of the pink coloring of her mother. The baby next to her has young green in his feathers. On the far right panel, another, perhaps slightly rebellious child stands away from the rest of the family. His feathers show blue. The parents occupy the second panel, the center of the group. The father is white and gold while the mother has silver and pink.

If there is trouble in the family, as long as the father and mother are close to each other, and help and love each other, they can work through the hard times together. Their mutual love creates a family, a happy family.
” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/1501-1504-Happy-Family.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 15
Phase 15

At the completion of Phase X, students have had some experience with all of the techniques and with a variety of ground fabrics. In their continuing study they work on ro, metallic fabric, and other unusual fabrics. While the ideal is to continue to take these classes in sequence, some leeway is allowed for individual needs. Designs for more advanced students continue to be added each year. In addition to the phase pieces, many practice designs and a small selection of especially challenging designs are available. These may be worked as students feel that their skill is suitable for the piece. Mr. Tamura also creates special designs to meet individual needs.
” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/1603-Silent-Communication.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 16
Phase 16
The ise shrimp wears a full suit of red armor and moves slowly and heavily, but powerfully across the sea floor. He looks like a venerable old man bent with age, but when something happens he can move swiftly and decisively. The shrimp is a product of the sea while the rice is a product of the land and the countryside. The fern is a symbol of prosperity. Taken together they are symbolic of the riches of Japan and signify congratulations.

The pine, bamboo and plum are the three friends of winter, which are tied together with gold and silver paper strings. The design as a whole signifies good fortune and congratulations, and may bring to mind good wishes for a New Year or some other happy event.
” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_phase1711.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 17
Phase 17

At the spawning season

the itinerant couple work together.

The female carp climbs and slithers,

fighting her way up the waterfall.

The male carp pushes her up with all his might and main through the turbulent current.
” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p1801-Itinerant-Couple10.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 18
Phase 18

At the completion of Phase X, students have had some experience with all of the techniques and with a variety of ground fabrics. In their continuing study they work on ro, metallic fabric, and other unusual fabrics. While the ideal is to continue to take these classes in sequence, some leeway is allowed for individual needs. Designs for more advanced students continue to be added each year. In addition to the phase pieces, many practice designs and a small selection of especially challenging designs are available. These may be worked as students feel that their skill is suitable for the piece. Mr. Tamura also creates special designs to meet individual needs.
” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p1902-ci8.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 19
Phase 19
Japanese traditions reach back 1600 years. Each collage represents the character of different periods, such as Edo, Momoyama, Keicho, Heian, and Asuka Nara. Also, the design is taken from Ainu culture. Through the artistic license of embroidery, all these periods are united in one design.
” href=”http://www.japaneseembroidery.com/class/img/all_phases_class/db_p2003-1600-Year-Collage10.jpg” rel=”lightbox[nature]”>Phase 20
Phase 20

Click here to add your own text